Norman & Foster

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Great Court at the British Museum

Designed by Foster and Partners, the Queen Elizabeth II Great Court transformed the Museum’s inner courtyard into the largest covered public square in Europe. It is a two-acre space enclosed by a spectacular glass roof with the world-famous Reading Room at its centre. 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

 

City Hall, London – London, UK, 1998-2002

Located on the south bank of the Thames, alongside the new More London development, City Hall is one of the capital’s most symbolically important new projects. Advancing themes explored earlier in the Reichstag, it expresses the transparency and accessibility of the democratic process and demonstrates the potential for a sustainable, virtually non-polluting public building.

200 Greenwich Street

Two World Trade Center, also known by its street address, 200 Greenwich Street, is a new office building under construction as part of the World Trade Center reconstruction in New York City. When completed, the tower will be located on the east side of Greenwich Street, across the street from the original location of the Twin Towers that were destroyed during the September 11, 2001 attacks.

The 79-story building was designed by Foster and Partners, London. The building will have a height of 1,270 feet (387 m), with a tripod-shaped antenna that allows the building to reach a total height of 1,350 feet (411 m). In comparison, the Empire State Building’s roof at the 102nd floor is 1,250 feet (381 m) tall, and its antenna is 1,472 ft (448 m), and the original 2 World Trade Center (often referred to as the “South Tower”) was 1,362 feet (415 m). The structural engineer for the building is WSP Cantor Seinuk, New York City. The Curtain Wall/Cladding consultant for the building is Permasteelisa SPA.

When constructed, the tower will be the second–tallest skyscraper on the World Trade Center site and the third–tallest in New York City, following the Empire State Building. The sloping roof consisting of four diamonds inclined toward the memorial will provide a visual marker around the skyline of just where the original towers were. The tower is designed to resemble a diamond, with cross bracing intersects and indentations breaking up the sides. The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey said the following about 200 Greenwich Street’s wedged rooftop: “Designed by Lord Norman Foster, the tower incorporates WTC master planner Daniel Libeskind’s ‘wedge of light’ concept, and will cast no shadow on the memorial park on September 11.”

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